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Emerald green, wild and free. This is the Smith River, one of the longest rivers in the National Scenic Rivers System and the only major river in California to remain un-dammed. Over ... more300 miles of this river are federally protected, forming an important part of the Smith River National Recreation Area. The US Forest Service is responsible for overseeing the diverse region as the Smith River and its tributaries make their way through the Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park and Redwoods National Park to the Pacific Ocean.

The National Recreation Area is more than 450 square miles of land set aside to preserve great forests, rare fauna, wilderness landscapes, pristine mountain lakes and immense, deep canyons. The presence of old growth trees serves to keep the river banks of the river and its tributaries shaded and cool, a key element to protecting native, cold-water fisheries. The area is well known for its abundance of steelhead trout and salmon.
Born of the spring snowmelt from Mount Dana and Mount Lyell, the Tuolumne starts in Yosemite National Park and runs for over fifty miles before entering the Stanislaus National Forest ... moreand public land managed by the Federal Bureau of Land Management. Flowing through some of America’s most glorious scenery, its whitewater rapids require respect as well as permits before entering its turbulent rifts. If you choose to float the river, the optimal time is between May and September. Water levels vary according to releases made by the Hetch Hetchy Water and Power agency as they manage the dam. Permits can be obtained from the Stanislaus National Forest’s Groveland Ranger District Office or by visiting the US Forest Service website.
Game Fish Opportunities:
Flowing for over 300 miles from its headwaters at Alturas, California, to the Sacramento River at Shasta Lake, the Pit River is one of the longest rivers in northern California. Full ... moreof fish, the river is home to rainbow trout, sculpin, hardhead, Sacramento suckers, speckled dace and Sacramento pikeminnow.
From over 13,000 feet on the south side of Mt. Lyell, the Merced River gets off to an icy, cold start. Winding through ancient canyons, carved by glaciers from another age, the river ... moreflows through Yosemite National Park down to the Lake McClure Reservoir. Its journey includes snow-covered peaks, alpine and subalpine meadows and clear, fresh water lakes. Pristine and largely unaffected by outside influences, the South Fork of the river still boasts one of the few self-sustaining populations of rainbow, eastern brook and brown trout.
Dworshak Reservoir, found in central Idaho along the North Fork of the Clearwater River, is located in scenic forested and mountainous country. Popular activities include swimming, ... moreboating, fishing, hunting, water-skiing, camping, hiking and lots more. At a height of 717 feet, the dam is the highest straight-axis gravity dam in North America, as well as one of the most dramatic in appearance. The Dworshak National Fish Hatchery is the largest steelhead trout hatchery in the world. Lewis and Clark camped in the area, where they rested from their trip over the Bitterroot Range and built canoes for their trip on to the Pacific Ocean. The reservoir is over 600 feet at its deepest point.
The Provo River features a premier blue ribbon trout fishery close to Utah's major cities. Brown and rainbow trout mature to record lengths in the Provo, with a most fish running 18 ... moreinches or bigger. In some areas the Provo offers 3,000 or more trout per mile. As a result, the waters of the Provo River provide exceptional recreation.

The Provo River flows through Utah County and Wasatch County, Utah. It rises in the Uinta Mountains at Washington Lake and flows about 70 miles southwest to Utah Lake at the city of Provo, Utah. The main branches of Provo River are the North Fork Provo River and the South Fork Provo River. In the Provo you'll find: Brown Trout, Common Carp, Cutthroat Trout, Mountain Whitefish, Rainbow Trout, Walleye, and White Bass.
The Sacramento River is the principal river of Northern California in the United States, and is the largest river in California. Rising in the Klamath Mountains, near Mount Shasta ... more(in Siskiyou county), the river flows south for 445 miles, through the northern section (Sacramento Valley) of the Central Valley, before reaching the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta and San Francisco Bay. It forms a common delta with the San Joaquin River before entering Suisun Bay, the northern arm of San Francisco Bay. The river drains about 27,500 square miles, with an average annual runoff of 22 million acre-feet, in 19 California counties, mostly within a region bounded by the Coast Ranges and Sierra Nevada known as the Sacramento Valley, but also extending as far as the volcanic plateaus of Northeastern California.
One of the region's most popular rivers for white water rafting and float boating, the McKenzie also offers easy access to world class trout and steelhead fishing. At this site, just ... more30 minutes east of Springfield on Highway 126, don't be suprised if you find yourself sharing the water with osprey, great blue herons, and bald eagles. These and other species are featured at the accessible Silver Creek Watchable Wildlife Site near Vida.
The North Fork and South Fork of the Kern Wild and Scenic River is located within a four-hour drive of more than one-third of the population of southern California. With its range ... moreof elevation, topography and vegetation, it offers a broad spectrum of recreation opportunities for all seasons of the year. Principal outdoor recreation activities include fishing, hiking, camping and whitewater boating.

The North Fork flows through Sequoia National Park and the Sequoia National Forest, past post-pile formations, spiked-granite protrusions and sharp rock ledges. The North Fork Kern River canyon within the Golden Trout Wilderness may be the longest, linear glacially-sculpted valley in the world. It contains regionally unique features referred to as Kernbuts and Kerncols. These rounded to elongated (parallel to the axis of the canyon) granitic knobs (Kernbuts) and the depressions between them (Kerncols) were first identified and named in the Kern Canyon.

The North Fork River corridor also includes regionally uncommon wetland habitat at Kern Lakes and the alkaline seep at the Forks of the Kern. The wetland habitat contains several uncommon aquatic and marsh species; the alkaline seep also supports several uncommon plants. The river's deep pool habitat supports a population of wild trout and also vividly colored hybrid trout.

The South Fork Kern River flows through a diverse landscape, including whitewater, waterfalls, large granite outcrops interspersed with open areas and open meadows with extensive vistas. The segment in the Dome Land Wilderness flows by numerous granitic domes and through a rugged and steep granitic gorge where whitewater rapids are common.

With a gradient of 30 feet per mile, the North Fork Kern is one of the steepest and wildest whitewater rivers in North America. The Forks Run is a nearly continuous series of Class IV and V rapids and waterfalls. The Upper Kern is a popular stretch of river for whitewater boating, camping and fishing. The Lower Kern runs 32 miles from Isabella Dam to the canyon mouth above Bakersfield, California.
As the only official “Blue Ribbon” river in the State of Washington, the Yakima is in a class of it’s own. Being close to the quaint town of Ellensburg adds to its allure. Originating ... morehigh in the eastern slopes of the Cascade Mountain’s Snoqualmie Wilderness and ending at Richland, this 214-mile long Columbia River tributary is a managed flow tailriver, controlled by the US Bureau of Reclamation and fed by three main reservoirs – the Kachess, Keechelus and Cle Elum.

Despite the controls, a mix of both bottom fed and top water releases create water conditions more like a freestone river than one encumbered by dams. Unlike most western waterways, its waters are low during the spring/fall months and high during summer when demand for irrigation is greatest.

The Yakima’s official 75-mile Blue Ribbon stretch starts where the three tailwaters merge near the town of Cle Elum, and continues on until reaching Roza Dam. The upper river down to the confluence of reservoirs tends to be braided and difficult to float. A flat section follows, known for wading and long rifles. At East Cle Elum the river runs 14 miles through its “upper canyon” section, populated with large boulders and an abundance of cutthroats.

From Diversion Dam to Wilson Creek is the farmland section. Known for apple orchards, Cottonwoods and Timothy Hay, the fishing is good but access difficult due to private landholdings. Arid Yakima Canyon that runs from Wilson Creek to Roza Dam is the most fished part of the river, typically by drift boat.

The river is open year round with runoff in May. While anglers come from afar to fish Yakima’s waters, it’s rarely over crowded. There’s a wide variety of fish, including rainbow, cutthroat, browns, brook, kokanee, burbot and smallmouth bass. Fish range in size from 12-14 inches.

Before booking a trip, be sure to check anticipated water levels and remember that this is a catch and release river.
Another superb east slope trophy trout stream. The Carson River runs in northwestern Nevada and empties into the Carson Sink. Good fishing can be found from the headwaters, through ... moreMarkleeville and the wild trout section, down to Minden. Much of the river below Markleeville is accessible only on foot or in a raft. No trout are planted here due the wild & scenic designation but the resident trout do quite nicely all alone like that.

The 205 miles Carson River watershed encompasses 3,966 square miles and includes two major forks in the Sierra Nevada in its upper watershed region. James "Grizzly" Adams trapped beaver in the Carson River around 1860, "In the evening we caught a fine lot of salmon-trout (cutthroat trout), using grasshoppers for bait, and in the night killed half a dozen beavers, which were very tame."
The Big Thompson is one of Colorado's finest streams. It flows from Forest Canyon Pass through Forest Canyon where it picks up volume as it is fed my numerous mountain creeks. It becomes ... morefishable at Moraine Park in Rocky Mountain National Park, about six miles below its headwaters. From Moraine Park wade and explore the many braids and channels. Delightful trails up and down river lead to fantastic flyfishing experiences.

With its headwaters in Rocky Mountain National Park, the Big Thompson river just below the town of Estes Park is a classic canyon trout river. This 30-foot-wide trout stream is best described as pocket water and riffles, which makes for great walk-wading fly-fishing. Between Estes Park and Drake the Big Thomson is special regulation water. You'll find wild rainbow trout in the 10-14 inch categories (stocking by the state stopped in 1994) and some brown trout. Below Lake Estes at Estes Park classic tailwater flows are well controlled with fairy stable discharge except for the annual runoff between March and April. From Estes Park the stream flows down to Loveland. The tailwater operates very stable for a dam.

The North Fork Big Thompson River also begins in Rocky Mountain National Park from where it flows along highway 43 east, through the town of Glen Haven and merges with the Big Thompson River in the town of Drake, in the Big Thompson Canyon.

Trout on the Big Thomson can be fincky and will not just take any dry fly you present. Light leaders, tippets and good presentation is called for. Flies should match the surprisingly large number of insects in the Big Thompson or aproximate what's about to hatch. The Big Thomson flows along the busy highway 34 which can make parking a bit crowded at time. However, this water should be well worth your time. On the Big Thomson it pays to visit with a guide the first few times. Local experts will provide you insight to the local hatch and provide instruction for how to fish the Big Thomson for a most productive experience.
The St. Vrain Creek or St. Vrain river as it is sometimes referred to is still a place where a flyfisher can find solitude. Simply put, it's a small stream fishing paradise. The St. ... moreVrain is a beautifyl creek that holds browns and rainbows in its lower reaches. The upper parts have good poplulations of brook trout and cutthroat trout.

Three main forks form the St. Vrain Creek. Highway 7 and Old St. Vrain Road follow the South Fork of the St. Vrain
Creek for 10 miles or so. Park and fish along the road. On County Road 96, just off Highway 72 you will find a trailhead for the South Fork which will take you back into the high country.

The Middle St. Vrain Creek rises along the continental divide, west of St. Vrain Mountain. It descends into a canyon to flow along State Highway 7 and past Raymond and joins the shorter South St. Vrain Creek about two miles below Raymond. Access the middle fork from a trailhead in the Peaceful valley.

North St. Vrain Creek rises northeast of St. Vrain Mountain near Allenspark and descends in a canyon to the east along U.S. Highway 36. The two branches join at Lyons, at the mouth of the canyon. Use the trainhead at Wild Basin to take you into the high country of the Rocky Mountain National Park.

The St. Vrain is a tributary of the South Platte River.
The Cache La Poudre river headwaters are at Poudre Lake in the northern part of Rocky Mountain National Park. The river descends eastward in the mountains through the Roosevelt National ... moreForest in Poudre Canyon. It emerges from the foothills north of the city of Fort Collins and flows on to Greeley. The Poudre River Trail follows the river for 11 miles through the national park where it changes to trail 944 finally becoming the Big South Trail. The Poudre river first meets Highway 14 at the bridge by the Big South Trail head.

From its headwaters, through the city of Fort Collins, the Cache la Poudre River contains abundant populations of self-sustaining wild trout. The vast majority of trout that live within the river system are brown trout. The Cache la Poudre River remains open in certain areas year-round. Special regulations have been designated for certain stretches of the Poudre by the Colorado Division of Wildlife. These regulations include the use of flies and artificial lures only and specify strict catch and release designations. Brown trout spawn in the fall and rainbow trout in the spring. Because of marginal flows and water quality the trout populations in the lower stretches of the Cache La Poudre have been fairly low in recent years and self-imposed catch and release is highly encouraged.

Along the river you will find the state fish hatchery and the Mishawaka Amphitheater on the Cache la Poudre river. There is no better way than kicking back after a long day of fishing with live music, a few beers, and the river as a backdrop.

The fly patterns that local fly shops invented specifically for the cache La Poundre are endless and to get acquainted with the river you do best by booking one of the local experienced guides that will show you the magic of this river.
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The Kootenay (spelled Kootenai in the U.S. and historically called the Flatbow) is a major river in southeastern British Columbia and flows through Montana and Idaho. ... more

The Kootenai River trout fishery begins below Libby Dam and stretches approximately 40 miles to the Idaho border. Above the Libby Dam, Lake Koocanusa Reservoir extends over 100 miles into the Canadian Rockies. The Kootenai’s wild and native rainbows are strong, hard fighters and are known to spool line off your reel only to put on a display of adrenaline pumping jumps. Streamers, fished deep produce native Bull trout up to the 10 pound range on the Kootenai. The Kootenai River is a classic dry fly fishery with long runs and flat pools that are perfectly suited for drifting a fly.

The Kootenai River is a bit off the beaten path, which make this the perfect getaway for those that enjoy a bit more solitude. Rainbow trout up to 33 pounds have been taken on the river. Hatches are prolific throughout the season and a steady release of water from the Libby dam provides for even flows. The Kootenai contains a native strain of rainbow trout, called Columbia Redbands and with 1500-2500 trout per mile there are plenty of fish that come to your fly. While waterflows can be an issue on other rivers during hot summer months, a steady supply from Lake Koocanusa keeps the local fish population of the Kootenai happy and cool.
The Weber River flows for 125-miles from northwest of the Uinta Mountains to the Great Salt Lake. The Weber River was named for American fur trapper John Henry Weber and is similar ... morein size to the Provo River.

A short drive from both Salt Lake City and Park City make this river a local favorite. The Weber flows south through two major reservoirs and has some incredible fishing on its way to the Great Salt Lake. Year round fly fishing can be found on the Weber, which is well known for producing wild brown trout that grow to trophy sizes well over 25 inches.

Angling traffic is light compared to the Provor river and with just a short 20-minute drive from Park City and excellent access, the Weber River is a gem. It is well recognized for its abundant hatches, making for great nymphing year round. Summer months offer outstanding dry fly fishing on carpets of caddis and over-abundant hoppers. Late winter through May, fish gobble down blue wing olives and Mothers Day caddis.

The Weber is divided into three sections by two big reservoirs. Fish for really big browns in the section between Rockport Reservoir and Echo Reservoir.
Game Fish Opportunities:
The Fremont River in Utah flows from the Johnson Valley Reservoir, which is located on the Wasatch Plateau near Fish Lake, southeast through Capitol Reef National Park to the Muddy ... moreCreek near Hanksville where the two rivers combine to form the Dirty Devil River, a tributary of the Colorado River.

Much of the lower stream is on private land, so ask for permission before fishing on any private land. The river can be divided into several distinct sections:

(1) The section upstream from Mill Meadow Reservoir contains an excellent population of wild brown trout. Splake, tiger, and rainbow trout are stocked in Mill Meadow and Forsyth reservoirs and can enter the river from the reservoirs. An occasional brook trout can also turn up. There are about 3.5 miles of fish-able water in this area on Forest Service land, upstream to Mamoit Spring. Above the spring the stream is much smaller and becomes de-watered directly below Johnson Reservoir in the winter when the outlet gates on the dam are shut. Most of the resident trout are under 15 inches, but some much larger fall spawning brown trout can move upstream out of Mill Meadow Reservoir. Also, the stream can be turbid in late summer when water is being released from Johnson Reservoir, but clears up at the end of the irrigation season.

(2) The river is completely de-watered below Mill Meadow Reservoir downstream to the Bicknell Bottoms. Numerous springs provide perennial flows in the Bicknell Bottoms, where State Wildlife Resources property includes the Kay E Bullock Waterfowl Management Area. Because of the springs, this area is a cold water marsh with some decent trout habitat in some areas. Fishing is allowed in the Waterfowl Management Area, but hiking through much of the marsh can be treacherous because of soft mud and dense cattails. Although there are some good-sized trout, the Bicknell Bottoms is not a typical trout stream and it is difficult to fish.

(3) Downstream from the Bicknell Bottoms the river enters a canyon and flows for about eight miles on private land from the Old Mill to the town of Torrey. The river contains decent numbers of rainbow and brown trout but permission must be obtained before fishing. Fishing guides and a local private ranch have provided services for fishermen.

(4) Further downstream, river access is available south of Torrey on SR 12. Here, the river can be fished downstream in a roadless canyon for about nine miles into Capitol Reef National Park. About two-thirds of this section is within the National Park. The river is often turbid, but can be excellent fishing when clear. The trout population can change from year to year depending on flash floods, but some big brown trout have been taken from this part of the river. Because of declining water quality, the trout population comes to an end at the confluence with Sulphur Creek near the park visitor center.

Other nearby fisheries include Fish Lake, Johnson Reservoir, Mill Meadow Reservoir, Forsyth Reservoir, Sevenmile Creek, UM Creek, Pine Creek, Thousand Lake Mountain and Boulder Mountain.
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The Strawberry river flows into Strawberry Reservoir and out through Soldier Creek Dam. The first 8 miles below Soldier Creek Dam are BLM land. This stretch is one of Utah's most productive ... morebrown and cutthroat trout fisheries and is accessed by a trail that runs along the north bank. The Strawberry river has a population of Bear Lake Cutthroat that have migrated from Strawberry Reservoir into the stream.

12 miles below Soldier Creek Dam the river runs by the Strawberry Pinnacles where it is joined by the tributaries Avintaquin Creek and Red Creek. The narrow canyon that the river runs through is characterized by high, steep cliffs and dense foliage. The river flows into Starvation Reservoir before it joins the Duchesne River east of the town of Duchesne, Utah.

This water upstream from USFS 124 (Bull Springs Road) to its headwaters has strict regulations, including some sections that are closed year round to protect spawning cutthrowat and Kokanee Salmon. Check current fishing regulations before you go. Below the road to the top of the reservoir is closed to fishing all year. However, don't snub your nose at the section below the reservoir. Great fishing is to be had here.

Strawberry Bay Campground is located on the shore of beautiful Strawberry Reservoir at an elevation of 7,200 feet. The campground is set among rolling sagebrush covered hills next to Strawberry Reservoir. Most campsites offer sweeping views of the reservoir and surrounding hills. Small pine trees dot the campground but provide very little shade.

Starvation Reservoir offers 3,500 acres of fishing four miles northwest of Duchesne on Highway 40. A 54 unit campground, sandy beach, modern rest rooms, showers, group-use area, and fish cleaning and sewage disposal stations are available. Primitive camping is allowed at designated areas around the reservoir.
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The Duchesne River is a trout fishing treasure. Several Blue Ribbon stretches produce some beautiful Brown, Cutthroat and Rainbow Trout. The Duchesne is a tributary of the Green River ... moreand is easily accessible from Salt Lake City or Park City Utah. The Duchesne River and its tributaries provide miles of fly fishing opportunities. The river is split into three sections, North Fork, West Fork and the Duchesne. The West Fork and the Duchesne river are considered one of Utah's blue ribbon fisheries. Native stands of cottonwood trees and willows grow along the river banks, while sagebrush and rabbitbrush fill the un-irrigated bench tops.

The West Fork flows approximately 16 miles from its head waters. This upper portion has public access through the Ashley National Forest. The lower portions of West Fork to the North Fork confluence flows through private property. There is however public access along the the lands that surround the river through private lands. At several good sized pull outs along SR-35 these access points are marked with small brown signs. The North And West Fork contain Bows, Browns, Brooks, Cutts, and Whitefish. Hatches include Caddis, Stones, and Western Green Drakes. Flies with good catch records are Para-Adams # 16 to 20, Sparkle Dun, olive # 14 to 22, Pheasant Tail Nymph # 18, BWO, olive # 18, CJ Nymph, copper # 14 to 18, and Black Wooly Bugger # 8.

The upper river flows through alpine meadows and forested canyons holds native Cutts and Wild Brooks. It slows and meanders through farmland and pastures in the lower reaches of Tilly Valley and is home to skiddish and Bows and Browns. From June to mid July large stones, green drakes and PMD’s are active. Weighted nymphs would be successful. Streamer action is good here also during high water.

Most of the public access to the main Duchesne river has been closed. Acquired public access from the North Fork confluence to just below the Sand Creek bridge allows fishing on approx 3.5 miles of the Duchesne river. There is no public access to the Duchesne river below the town of Hanna.

In the river you'll find stoneflies, caddis flies, mayflies, diptera larva, water beetles, amphibians, dace, sculpin, small trout, white fish and suckers.

Via highway, Salt Lake City is 114 miles, Vernal is 58 miles, and Price 54 miles away. In the summer months I-80 east will take you from Salt Lake City to exit 148 Heber/Vernal. US-40 leads you to the Park City/Kamas/Francis exit. Turn left onto SR-248 towards Kamas/Francis. Approx 11.4 miles turn right onto SR-32. Follow SR-32 through town to a four way stop. Turn Left onto SR-35 and continue over Wolf Creek Pass and the river off to your right on the other side.

In the winter months continue on US-40 to Fruitland Utah. In Fruitland take a left on SR-208 towards Tabiona Utah. From SR-208 turn left on SR-35. Past Hanna Utah you will encounter fishing access locations.
The Klickitat River, located in south-central Washington, flows generally south from its origin on Mt. Adams in the high country of the Yamaka Indian Reservation to its confluence ... morewith the Columbia River in the Columbia River Gorge. The designated segment is the lowermost 10.8 miles of the river. At the upper end of this segment, the river flows through a broad canyon. As it drops toward the Columbia at a steady gradient of 26 feet per mile, the canyon tightens and small rapids spike the channel.

At about river mile 2.5, the Klickitat drops into a tight, rock-walled gorge. The water cascades and crashes through the rocky channel where the tribes and bands of the Yamaka Nation have used dip-net fishing continuously for generations to catch salmon and steelhead. Of the mid-Columbia tributaries, the Klickitat is one of the favored fishing sites, due to both the number of fish and the narrow canyon with its high water volume.

In addition to the river's outstanding hydrology, the geology of the gorge between river mile 1.1 and 2.5, and the dip-net fishing sites, the river is also the most significant anadromous fishery on the Washington side of the Columbia in the stretch from Bonneville Dam to the Snake River. It supports steelhead trout, Chinook salmon and coho salmon, with six distinct runs.

The lower Klickitat offers a variety of recreation opportunities, including boating, fishing, hiking, camping and sightseeing. Boat fishing is popular when the salmon and steelhead are running. There is an undeveloped boat put-in/take-out on Klickitat County Park land just below the Pitt bridge, and river access at several places along Highway 142, including a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife fee camp site. The take-out is before the fish screw trap at about river mile 5, just above the Klickitat canyon gorge. Ongoing construction of the fish bypass at the top of Lyle Falls requires boaters to take out at this point. The falls also marks the beginning of the tribal in-lieu fishing sites and no boating is allowed through this area.

The only permits required are from commercial outfitters; existing commercial outfitters include beginning kayak schools and fishing guides.

The Spokane, Portland and Seattle Railroad built a railway linking Lyle and Goldendale in 1903. This branch line was abandoned in 1992 and is now the Klickitat Rails-to-Trail. The trail parallels the river's east bank from the Columbia River to Fisher Hill Bridge, where it crosses to the west bank and continues to the town of Pitt. It crosses Highway 142 and continues along the west bank leaving the wild and scenic river portion and continues for many miles upriver.

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