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The Stillwater River starts in the Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness south of the Beartooth Mountains in southern Park County, near the state line with Wyoming. It runs northeast, between ... morethe Absaroka Range to the west and the Beartooth Mountains to the east, through Custer National Forest, past Nye and Absarokee. It joins the Yellowstone near Columbus, Montana.

This Stillwater is a blue ribbon fishery. Trout are the primary game fish, but Mountain Whitefish are also common. In the river's lower sections, Rainbow Trout and Brown Trout are the most common, but towards the headwaters Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout and Brook Trout show up with increased frequency. In the spring Rainbow Trout from the Yellowstone River enter the Stillwater to spawn, some traveling as far upstream as Nye. In the fall, Brown Trout also enter the river from the Yellowstone to spawn. It is during these seasons that larger fish up to 5 pounds can be more easily found. Despite its misleading name, the Stillwater's most popular stretches contain class II and III whitewater. While float fishing from a raft is a common way to fish the river, it is recommended that only experienced rowers attempt to navigate it.
Nestled in the Methow River Valley and known as the Jewel of the Cascades, this 80-mile Columbia tributary is known for its great beauty and abundant trout. By car, it can be reached ... morewithin two hours from Ellensburg or about 3 ½ hours from Seattle. Five towns dot the valley landscape - Mazama, Winthrop Twisp, Carlton and Methow – each with a charm of their own.

The Methow and its tributaries, the Twisp River, Cedar Creek and Early Winters Creek begin in the high, Methow Pass area of the Cascades and continue to join with additional tributaries until their confluence with the Columbia River at Pateros. The Pacific Rim Trail follows the River’s upper reaches while other landmarks such as Star Peak and Mt. Bigelow, two of the state’s highest peaks, add to the river’s splendor.

The river can be waded or floated. Anglers tend to divide the river into three sections: Winthrop to Twisp; Twisp to Carlton; and, Carlton to Gold Creek. Each has differing flows although the lower section has rapids and tends to be turbulent.

Steelhead season changes annually but the trout season typically opens June 1st and closes September 30th. The section below Winthrop is considered by many to be the most desirable. Dry fishing throughout the summer is excellent but fall/winter is the best time, especially for those interested in steelhead. Still something of an insider’s river, the clear watered Methow is often overlooked by anglers and is rarely congested.

Species include wild rainbow trout, wild cutthroat, native bull trout, steelhead (indigenous and hatched) and chinook salmon. While fish tend to average about 12 inches, there are recent reports of 18-25 inch trout being found southeast of Carlton.

Before booking a trip, check to see if the river is closed for spawning and if all fish need to be released. Depending on conditions, anglers may be permitted to keep hatchery steelhead.
This 75-mile river, the largest tributary of the Yakima, starts off in Naches Pass and is known as the Little Naches until its confluence with the Bumping River. At that point, it ... moreofficially becomes the Naches. Draining into the eastern Cascades, the upper river runs through rugged mountains and scenic wilderness, offering anglers an opportunity to enjoy pristine environs at less than an hour’s drive from Ellensburg.

Further down, the lower Naches and its main tributary, the Tieton River, run through open valleys filled with orchards, flowered meadows and fertile farmland before emptying into the Yakima. Best described as a wild, freestone tailwater, it is less frequented than neighboring rivers, making it an excellent choice for anyone seeking a quiet, outdoor adventure.

Summer season begins June 1st, just in advance of the winter runoff, and continues through late October. The runoff can cause a bit of stain to the water’s clarity, but that is typically short lived. During the summer months the Naches can be waded or floated, although the water current can be strong and its rapids can be challenging.

Known for its abundant trout, the river is home to wild rainbow, native cutthroat, hybrid cut-bows and bull trout species. Average size is approximately 10 inches although larger fish are not uncommon.

Before booking your trip ask about possible fall spawning closures and be prepared to catch and release.
Many anglers have a love it or hate it attitude toward the tiny, 7-mile long, Rocky Ford Creek. Located about an hour’s drive from Ellensburg, it flows through mostly arid, flat lowland. ... moreThose inclined to hate the creek will be the first to tell you it’s slow, unexciting and the least scenic of the area’s waters. Nevertheless, there are three really good reasons to love it. First it’s open 365 days a year. Second, the climate is mild and year round hatches make winter fishing possible. Finally, its top, public section is a miracle mile of rainbow trout.

Unlike most Washington State rivers that emanate from mountain runoff, Rocky Creek literally percolates underground and seeps up through the rich, Columbia Basin soil. Maintaining a nearly constant temperature, it moves south and eventually flows into Moses Lake. Also unusual, the creek originates near Trout Lodge, Inc., a hatchery that produces triploids and sells them to the state. Because the hatchery is partly located on state land, the state accepts fish for rent, and a portion of this “rent” gets placed right into Rocky Creek.

Wading is prohibited on the creek but given its narrow width and reedy banks, it’s easy to cast from shore. The constant clarity of the water enables you to actually see the fish and fish from sight. In addition to a full range of insects, the Rocky Ford has thousands of scuds that live alongside leeches on the muddy, weedy creek bottom. Rainbows are amply fed from these sources and tend to quickly grow quite large. Trout in excess of 5 pounds are unexceptional while rainbows ranging from 16-20 inches are commonplace.

Before booking your trip remember that this is a “fly fishing only” river that cannot be waded, prohibits use of bait, enforces a single, barbless hook requirement and is catch and release only. 
The Columbia River is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest. The river rises in the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia. It flows northwest and then south into the US state of ... moreWashington, then moves west to create much of the border between Washington and Oregon before ending at the Pacific Ocean. The river is 1,243 miles long, and its largest tributary of the Snake River.

The Columbia River is a top sport fishing river. From the mouth of the river at Astoria, Oregon and Ilwaco, Washington to the Hanford Reach, quality fishing for Salmon, Steelhead and Sturgeon exists year around.
Game Fish Opportunities:
Yellowstone Lake is the largest body of water in Yellowstone National Park. The lake is 7,732 feet above sea level and covers 136 square miles with 110 miles of shoreline. While the ... moreaverage depth of the lake is 139 ft, its greatest depth is at least 390 ft. Yellowstone Lake is the largest freshwater lake above 7,000 ft in North America.

Yellowstone Lake has native Cutthroat Trout and non-native lake trout. The strict regulations have improved the sizes and numbers of these trout. 
The American River watershed offers fishermen (and fisherwomen) a wide range of experiences, from fly-fishing in the clear streams of the Sierra Nevada to casting for steelhead in ... morethe lower American as it flows through Sacramento. The American River contains two main sections. The North Fork and the Lower American River

The North Fork of the American River is designated as a while trout water. Most of the North Fork flows through a deep canyon carved through metamorphic rock. It has a very rugged character with very steep slopes and a narrow bottom. Deep pools framed by sheer cliffs, waterfalls cascading from 40 to 70 feet, and benches, densely wooded with alder and willow are typical of the beauty found in the North Fork Canyon. The fishery is dominated by Rainbow trout, with an occasional Brown trout (the brown trout are usually lunkers!).

Fishing enthusiasts can choose from a number of trails to access the river canyon, most of them dropping steeply from the canyon rim down to the water. While visitation peaks in the summer, primarily driven by hikers/swimmers, late spring into mid-summer is typically the height of the boating season. The highest boatable reach is known as Generation Gap (12 miles), run by only the most experienced Class V boaters, which can only be accessed by a three-mile long walk. The next lower reach, known as Giant Gap (14 miles), is also Class V and is accessed by a two-mile hike down the Euchre Bar Trail. Although overnight camping permits are not required, if visitors want a campfire, they will need to obtain a fire permit.

The Lower American River is a short stretch of river, flowing through the city of Sacramento, is the most heavily used recreation river in California. It provides an urban greenway for trail and boating activities and is also known for its runs of steelhead trout and salmon.
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Nestled in rocky basin along side steep canyon walls, this 40-mile Feather River tributary is known for its great beauty and abundant trout. By car, it a short drive from Sacramento. ... moreThe Yuba River continues through the canyons until it flattens around Parks Bar Bridge then runs parallel to highway.

Species include wild rainbow trout, steelhead in the fall, and striped bass. While rainbows tend to average about 12 inches, there are recent reports of 18-25 inch trout being found.
The Ogden River, a tributary of the Weber River, begins in the Wasatch Range from where it runs for 35-miles. The Ogden River's three forks converge at Pineview Reservoir, near Huntsville. ... moreThe river then flows southwest through Ogden Canyon, Ogden City, and the border of West Haven and Marriott-Slaterville where it joins the Weber River.

The South Fork of the Ogden River between Causey and Pineview reservoirs (about 10 miles) is a scenic river with good public access and stretches of private land. This means you should pay close attention to signs and ask for permission before fishing on private property. The Odgen’s South Fork drops from 5,500 feet to 4,900 feet at the downstream end. This section of the South Fork is a serene 15-30 feet wide and provides anglers with great opportunity to catch native Bonneville cutthroat trout, brown trout, and mountain whitefish. The depth here is variable; ranging from less than one foot in shallow riffles up to 3 to 4 feet in deeper pools and runs. Fuel, restaurants, and grocery stores can all be found in the nearby towns of Huntsville and Eden.

If you decided to fish the stretch of Odgen River below the convergence of its three forks, you might as well stay in Odgen. As you head out, take Hwy 39 in Ogden (12th Street) and travel east. The river runs along the Highway which makes 7 miles upstream easily accessible. Visitors that journeying up this narrow canyon find at an elevation of 4,400 to 4,900 feet both excellent fishing and alpine beauty all around them. The Ogden River Scenic Byway SR-39 climbs through the Wasatch-Cache National Forest to crystal clear Pineview Reservoir, about six miles east of the mouth of the canyon.

Close proximity to Ogden, UT makes this Blue Ribbon water convenient for anglers looking for robust trout populations in a beautiful setting. Remember, this is a whirling disease positive water and anglers should take care to clean and dry their equipment before moving to other waters.

Those that desire one of Utah’s more distinctly urban fisheries should head to the Ogden River Parkway, which runs from the mouth of Ogden Canyon to Washington Blvd, approx. 1700 S

Directions:

From Salt Lake City take I-15 N for 33.6 miles. Take exit 341 onto UT-79 E/31st Street. Follow UT-79 E/31st Street for 1.2 miles. Turn left onto US-89 N/South Washington Blvd. Travel on South Washington Blvd. for 2.5 miles. Turn right onto E 1200 S Street/12th Street. Follow 12th Street for 1.2 miles. Continue straight onto UT-39 E/Canyon Road. Follow UT-39 for 20.3 miles toward the town of Huntsville.
Considered one of the finest and most challenging trout fisheries in the country, the 28-mile Vermont, spring-fed stretch starts in the Green Mountains near the East Dorset town of ... moreBennington. From the border of New York, the river continues for another 31 miles in a southerly direction until it reaches Easton, NY and empties into the Hudson River. It is one of several rivers that form the 400+ mile Hudson River drainage basin. It’s also where the smart fish live.

When fishing the Vermont portion of this river, assume the trout have earned PhD’s in evasion techniques and are there to test your mettle. Before 1975, Vermont stocked the Battenkill (NY State still does) but now it’s gone native and all the trout are wild. Since this is a catch and release river, by the time a fish is two or three years old, it’s probably been caught more than once and when it comes to flies, the fish have seen them all. As one observer summed it up, there are lots of sizeable browns in the Battenkill but they didn’t get big by being dumb.

Near Manchester the river is scenic, narrow and characterized by soft bottoms, small pools and a few deep runs and rifles with mostly smaller brook and browns. The river widens as you approach Arlington, where the trout tend to lurk in slow moving pools. By the time you approach the state line the fish are typically 12 -16 inches long and more plentiful, but rarely easier to catch. This freestone river is a terrific choice for experts and for anglers ready to up their game.

Before booking your Battenkill trip there are a few things to keep in mind:

The New York season is year round while Vermont is limited from April - October.

There is good public access but sections of the river are private access only

It’s catch and release
A mere five miles from Manchester, this freestone, spring-fed river, like the Battenkill, begins, near Dorset in Vermont’s Green Mountains. A tributary of Lake Champlain, the 28-mile ... morelong Mettawee is among Vermont’s most highly regarded trout streams, boasting 500 fish per mile. The landscape along the 16-mile stretch of river that runs through Vermont, is dotted with rolling hills and charming farm houses, providing a postcard view of New England.

To access the upper part of the stream follow Lower Hollow Road out of Dorset. At its headwaters, you can expect to find native brook and rainbow trout. Following state highway #30 offers river access as do its several bridges. The mid-section of the river is made up largely of long rifles and pools. Pocket water here is scarce and the currents are mild. Continuing down, the landscape changes from farm to forest. In the lower section of the river you will find both browns and rainbows, some of which were stocked by the state in prior years.

The best time to fish is late May and June. The summer months can be difficult so if you fish at this time, most guides recommend moving into some of the Mettawee’s many tributaries where the water is likely to be cooler. By the middle of September the weather begins to cool down and its possible to return to the main course of the river. Motivated by the impetus to spawn, the fish tend to be hungrier and less particular, making them easier to catch. Given the narrow width of the river, at some points a mere 20 feet across, it is easily waded and can be fished with relatively short rods.

Before booking a trip on the Mettawee, inquire about variations in seasonal water temperatures and remember that you must return all fish between 10-14 inches.
Severely damaged by Hurricane Irene just a short time ago, by all reports the river not only survived - it is thriving. Originating in the wilds of the Green Mountain National Forest, ... morea vast area of preserved trees, abundant animal life and recreational trails, this short tributary of the Hoosic River, (only 17 miles long) is widely recognized for its great fly fishing.

In the past, the river was diverted to power knitting mills and shoe factories and could at times, nearly run dry. Today it runs freely and forcefully with rapids ranging from Class I to Class III, which probably accounts for its nickname, The Roaring Branch River.

Known for its headwater’s brook trout as well as rainbows and browns that can be found throughout, in 2014 the state added 1000 2 year old, 14 inch long trophy trout to the river. Raised in the Bennington Fish Hatchery the mix consists of 750 rainbow and 250 browns. There are also proposals to reset limits on the number and size of fish that can be taken from the river and to lengthen the fly fishing season for portions of the river. The best sections to fish are from the Paper Bridge to the New York Border.

A mere 15 miles from Manchester, the river is also not far from the town of Bennington and scores of other tourist attractions. If you have family or other members of your party that don’t feel like fishing, there are museums, shopping and historical sites to visit, not to mention other outdoor recreational opportunities.

Before setting out to fish this river, be sure to:

Check to see if the April –October seasonal dates have been extended

Check the rules regarding catch and release since they may have recently changed
From its source at the outlet of Holmes Lake in the Monashee Mountains of British Columbia, the Kettle River flows south to Midway, British Columbia. Along the way it is joined by ... moremany tributaries, most notably the West Kettle River. Below Midway, the river loops south into the United States, through Ferry County, Washington, before flowing north back into Canada, passing by Grand Forks, British Columbia where the Granby River joins. After flowing east for about 10 miles (16 km), the river turns south again, just south of Christina Lake,[6] entering the United States again.

THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF WASHINGTON does not receive much attention. One of the rivers in this part of the state is the Kettle. The overall, fish counts are not high on this incredibly clear freestone river, yet someday's you might think the dry fly fishing could not get any better! The genetics of the redbands are very clean. These rainbows are some of the hardest fighting and beautiful fish you have ever experienced.
A favorite among NC fishermen, the Davidson originates in the mountainous Pisgah National Forest, a scenic area surrounded by other national parks and preserved forest land. As the ... moreriver wends its way south and nears Asheville, it empties into the French Broad River. Since being included on the Trout Unlimited list of top 100 trout fishing streams in the nation, its popularity has grown, bringing an increasing number of out-of-state anglers.

Luckily the state works hard to keep the river healthy and the fish flourishing. The river is divided into sections based on the regulations that apply to each. From its headwaters to the confluence with Avery’s Creek, it’s wild fish only, fly fishing only and strictly catch and release. From Avery’s Creek to the national forest line, you’ll find hatchery supported brooks and rainbows.

The section between the Pisgah hatchery and Looking Glass Creek is what really draws fishermen to this river. Here you can expect to find clear, slow moving pools, few overhead obstructions and lots of hatches that support brooks, browns and rainbows, many over 18-inches long. Like other heavily fished waters, the fish can be cunning and despite their large numbers, hard to reel in.

Route 276, near the town of Pisgah, parallels the river, providing lots of public access. There are stretches of restricted private land, although there is a 3 mile section where you can purchase temporary fishing access. Much of the river can be waded and enjoyed with your feet in the water.
There are three forks to the Holston River, but if you are into fishing for trout, the South Fork is the one you want. In less than two hours drive from Asheville, you can be fishing ... moreone of the finest tailwater trout waters east of the Mississippi. The 112 mile long South Fork Holston River, referred to as the SoHo, is part of the greater Tennessee River drainage basin, managed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Oblivious to borders, the river starts in Virginia and ends at its confluence with the North Fork in Tennessee.

The South Holston Dam, the uppermost of three on the South Fork, created the landmark South Holston Lake. It is the tailwaters below the lake that have made this stretch of water so desirable. Here, the insects are humming, the favorable water temperature is uniform 12 months of the year and the fish are thriving. 

Throughout the approximate 15 mile section below the dam, stocked rainbows, wild browns and smallmouth bass can be found. According to a recent Tennessee Wildlife Resource Authority (TVRA) survey, there are 5,000 to 6,000 trout per mile, averaging 12 inches in length; it’s not uncommon to find 20+ inches.

This is a river that is usually floated but can be waded depending on water levels. Because the TVA is constantly adjusting water flows, levels can change without notice and whether floating or wading, obtaining a release schedule and a skilled guide is highly recommended.

Before booking a trip keep in mind that sections of the river are closed to protect spawning browns between November and January, all trout 16-20 inches must be released and only one over 22 inches may be taken home.
The headwaters of the 78.5 mile long Watauga, begin at Peak Mountain in North Carolina on the western slope of the Eastern Continental Divide, and end at its confluence with the South ... moreFork of the Holston River. This trout filled tributary of the Holston is a mere 1 hour, scenic drive from Asheville.

Managed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) the Watauga, like most rivers in the watershed, is affected by dams, water releases and reservoirs. The Watauga Dam created the 6,430 acre Watauga Lake. Three miles further down river, are the much smaller Wilbur Dam and Lake, used during the summer to release water back into the river. The 20 mile tailwater from Wilbur Dam to Boone lake is the most prized trout fishing part of the river.

Like other tailwaters in the region, the temperature remains between 50 to 55 degrees most of the year, providing great habitat for trout. The Tennessee Valley Resource Authority (TVRA) stocks the tailwater with rainbows, brooks and browns alongside a small population of wild trout. Most fish are in the 12 inch range although much larger fish are there to be caught. Estimates range from 2,000 to 5,000 fish per mile.

Depending on water releases the river can be waded although it’s advisable to get a TVA discharge schedule before entering the water. Wading access can be limited since property holders own the riverbed and can deny entry. The water may be fished at any time from a small boat, although due to shallow pools, you may want to keep one generator running if you use a drift boat. The river is composed of a few fast runs and long sections of rifles but large, long pools can also be found.
Only an hour outside of Asheville, all four sections of the Tuckasegee River are included on the Western North Carolina Fly Fishing Trail, five if you count the West Tuck - and there ... moreare only 15 spots on the trail list! In other words, this river has a lot to offer. Beginning at the confluence of the Panthertown and Greenland Creeks, the river flows for 60 miles until it joins the Little Tennessee. Its basin is sizeable, draining an estimated 655 miles.

The river is well stocked with brooks, browns and rainbows, although there are still wild fish throughout. State support for the river is generous with an estimated 50,000 fish added each season. Not surprisingly, the river boasts one of the highest fish counts in North Carolina, purportedly 9,000 fish per mile. Large numbers of rainbows and browns reach trophy proportion, both in weight and length.

Delayed harvest has been successfully employed through the 5 mile section between 107 Bridge and the riverside park in Dillsboro. As a result, this section is catch and release only, from October to June. That said, experts consider this the best place to achieve a “Tuckasegee Slam” where you reel in all three species in one spot.

One of the more inviting aspects of this river is its accessibility. Highway access is ample and parking is well marked and available for most of the river. The East Laporte Park to the 107 Bridge offers picnic tables and public restrooms. The river can be waded and floated in the middle and lower sections.
Lower Neuse River is the widest river in North America at 7.5 miles wide at it's entry point to the Pamlico Sound. It is a brackish in nature and without lunar tides, but does have ... morewide tides. It is home to many salt and warm water species.
Recognized as one of the most renowned trout rivers in the country, this 722 mile river flows northward from Arkansas into Missouri. It starts in the Arkansas Boston Mountains that ... moretower above the Ozark- St. Francis National Forest near Fayetteville. A tributary of the Mississippi, it is the source of several tributaries including the North Fork River, Little Red River, Black River, James River and the Bayou des Arc, and drains over 27,765 square miles of river basin.

Thanks to the Army Corps of Engineers, there are several dams and reservoirs affecting its character and flow. The river is most famous for the 30 mile tailwater below the man-made, Bull Shoals Lake, although fishing throughout the upper river and Lake Taneycomo are also excellent. What makes the portion below Bull Shoals special is the cold water discharge from the dam, providing ideal trout habitat.

Wild browns are abundant and are supplemented by the State with rainbows, cutthroats, and brook. Fish are usually in the 12 to 16 inch range, although much larger fish are easily found. Some well traveled anglers argue that typical browns here out measure the largest browns found elsewhere. Many Arkansas state trout records have been broken here. Imagine reeling in a 19 pound rainbow or a 30+ pound brown. It’s possible on this section of the White.

Access to the river is excellent. Anglers can fish these waters from the banks or by wading or floating. Since water levels vary according to electric power demands, the river can suddenly become high and swift so a bit of caution is advised. One great feature is that it can be fished during the winter months when other streams may be closed.

Before wading, check the number of turbines running at the power station since it affects conditions on the water.

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