Name
Showing 11 - 20
 
out of 34
On the left map, we grouped Fishing Water Reports that are located close to each other into small circles. Now, you can locate all Fishing Water Reports on the map at the same time. You can also drag & zoom the map.

Circle numbers - Count of Fishing Water Reports that are located in and around that circle.

Colored circles - Fishing Water Reports that are displayed in the list below.

Grey circles - Fishing Water Reports that are displayed on next page(s).

Half colored circles - Some Fishing Water Reports in that circle appear in the list below and some on next page(s).

Click on circles to zoom in or highlight Fishing Water Reports .
page 2 out of 4
The Provo River features a premier blue ribbon trout fishery close to Utah's major cities. Brown and rainbow trout mature to record lengths in the Provo, with a most fish running 18 ... moreinches or bigger. In some areas the Provo offers 3,000 or more trout per mile. As a result, the waters of the Provo River provide exceptional recreation.

The Provo River flows through Utah County and Wasatch County, Utah. It rises in the Uinta Mountains at Washington Lake and flows about 70 miles southwest to Utah Lake at the city of Provo, Utah. The main branches of Provo River are the North Fork Provo River and the South Fork Provo River. In the Provo you'll find: Brown Trout, Common Carp, Cutthroat Trout, Mountain Whitefish, Rainbow Trout, Walleye, and White Bass.
Game Fish Opportunities:
The Truckee River is a stream in the U.S. states of California and Nevada. The river flows northeasterly and is 121 miles long. The Truckee is the sole outlet of Lake Tahoe and drains ... morepart of the high Sierra Nevada, emptying into Pyramid Lake in the Great Basin. Its waters are an important source of irrigation along its valley and adjacent valleys.

The Truckee River's source is the outlet of Lake Tahoe, at the dam on the northwest side of the lake near Tahoe City, California. It flows generally northeast through the mountains to Truckee, California, then turns sharply to the east and flows into Nevada, through Reno and Sparks and along the northern end of the Carson Range. At Fernley it turns north, flowing along the east side of the Pah Rah Range. It empties into the southern end of Pyramid Lake, a remnant of prehistoric Lake Lahontan, in northern Washoe County in the Pyramid Lake Indian Reservation.

The Truckee River's endorheic drainage basin is about 3,060 square miles (7,900 km2), of which about 2,300 square miles (6,000 km2) are in Nevada. The Middle Watershed is regarded as the 15 miles (24 km) of river and its tributaries from Tahoe City in Placer County, through the Town of Truckee in Nevada County, to the state line between Sierra and Washoe counties. The major tributaries to the Truckee River in California from the Lake Tahoe outlet and heading downstream include: Bear Creek, Squaw Creek, Cabin Creek, Pole Creek, Donner Creek, Trout Creek, Martis Creek, Prosser Creek, the Little Truckee River, Gray Creek, and Bronco Creek. Major lakes and reservoirs in the California part of the watershed include Lake Tahoe, Donner Lake, Independence Lake, Webber Lake, Boca Reservoir, Stampede Reservoir, Prosser Creek Reservoir, and Martis Creek Reservoir. In the Lower Watershed, Steamboat Creek, which drains Washoe Lake, is the major tributary to the Truckee River.
The Boulder River originates in the rugged, high elevations of the Beartooth Mountains in the Gallatin National Forest. It tumbles down 7,300 feet and 60 miles through mixed conifers, ... moredeciduous trees, shrubs, grassland, and agricultural land, to join the Yellowstone River. Most of its drainage lies within the Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness. The upper main Boulder cuts through a glacial valley from the headwaters to Two-Mile Bridge, flowing clear, cold and fast.

This 22.5-mile segment combines rapids, riffles, plunges, long, wide pools, and short stretches of spawning and rearing habitat in a spectacular sub-alpine setting. As the river runs north 6.5 miles to Natural Bridge and Falls, its gradient lessens, resulting in clean gravels, riffles, runs, and deep pools. Below the Falls, for 4 to 5 miles, the Boulder meanders through agricultural land to its confluence with the East Boulder. Its final 28 miles from this point to the mouth are somewhat steeper and strewn with boulders and cobbles.

The main Boulder, East and West Boulder rivers and their many tributaries provide a wide diversity of fisheries habitats and recreation opportunities, and sustain an agricultural economy. The system is part of the habitat required by fish from the Yellowstone River. It is subject to extreme runoffs, droughts, wildfire, mass wasting of soils and rock, and the impacts of agriculture, land development, and channelization. Upper portions of the main Boulder River are designated 'Scenic' and have been considered for 'Wild and Scenic' Classification.
Ennis Lake is a medium sized reservoir that separates the Upper and Lower Madison Rivers. A day trip on Ennis Lake is a great option when planning a Montana fly fishing trip. The lake ... moreis located just minutes from the town of Ennis and is also a short drive for anglers fishing around Bozeman. 

Ennis lake is a very shallow impoundment with most of the lake less than 8 feet deep. The inlet where the Channels of the Madison drain into the lake provide shallow flats with weedbeds that harbor outstanding trout habitat. These shallow flats also allow for wade fishing. We use drift boats to access the upper half of the lake during prime hatches that take place on the lake in the late summer. The majority of the fishing on Ennis lake is sight fishing to large cruising browns and rainbows. We either fish directly from the drift boat or get out and wade on some of the flats. Occasionally we split a day with the morning spent casting to rising trout on Ennis lake and the afternoon spent fly fishing the Madison River.

Fishing is good early in the season when the ice first melts but the fish are deeper and blind fishing around drops and structure is most productive. As the summer progresses callibaetis and tricorythode mayflies become the dominant food source for the trout. Intense hatches occur daily in the late summer producing a daily feeding frenzy that every fly fisherman should experience. Trout feeding during these famous hatches have been labeled "gulpers" after the frequent sucking noise they make as they swim around with open mouths while inhaling the hatching mayflies.
Game Fish Opportunities:
Fishing Access Sites:
While it may seem nonsensical to think of Marilyn Monroe and fly fishing in the same breath, the Salmon River and the “blonde bombshell” are permanently linked together in American ... morefolklore. Given it’s wild runs and deep canyons, the river acquired the moniker of the “River of No Return, and was made famous when Monroe and Mitchum starred in a 1954 film with the same name. In fact, the Salmon runs unobstructed for 425 miles, making it the longest free-flowing river within one state in the lower 48.

Not only are its rapids wild and untamed, the Salmon also travels through two nationally designated preserves, the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness and the Gospel Hump Wilderness areas. Recognized for its scenic importance, Congress declared the 46 miles of the river from North Fork to Corn Creek as a national recreational river and the 79 miles from Corn Creek to Long Tom Bar as a wild river. At points along the Salmon its granite walls are one-fifth deeper than the Grand Canyon and over 180 miles of the river is more than one mile deep.

Fed by several tributaries such as the Yankee Fork, South Fork Salmon and Little Salmon, the river supports both cold and warm water fish including smallmouth bass, bull trout, sockeye salmon, Chinook salmon, squawfish, sucker and catfish. Legend has it that white sturgeon over 12 feet long and over 100 years old also inhabit these waters. The Salmon and Snake rivers provide critical habitat for steelhead trout and Chinook salmon. These fish require both salt and fresh water and use these streams to navigate from the rivers where they spawn, to the ocean where they spend their adult lives. The river offers high quality sport fishing for resident populations of cutthroat and rainbow trout as well as steelhead and mountain whitefish.
Big Spring Creek, one of the largest spring-fed streams in Montana, originates 9 miles southeast of Lewistown, near the state's Big Springs Trout Hatchery. It runs northwesterly 30 ... moremiles, mainly between the Big Snowy and Judith mountains, and enters the Judith River west of Brooks, Montana. Enclosing the large spring at the head of the creek, giant willows and cottonwoods shade a park and wildlife viewing area. From the spring, cold, high-quality water flows over green mats of water plants and down between birches, willow, hawthorne, native shrubs and grasses.

The creek continues its first 20 miles alongside hay and grazing fields and US 191, passing through Lewistown. Above the town, Big Spring Creek averages 38 feet wide, 18 inches deep, below to the mouth, 45 feet wide, 24 inches deep. Water quality degrades going downstream, due to erosion and pollution. In its last 10 miles, from the mouth of Cottonwood Creek to the Judith, the channel migrates. Its silty bottomland supports dense stands of cottonwoods, willows, birches, and hawthorne. Considered by anglers to be the most important trout stream in central Montana, Big Spring Creek attracts large numbers of wildlife, including waterfowl and furbearers. Agriculture, municipal and recreation uses, hunting, and homesite development depend on or are associated with Big Spring Creek.
Game Fish Opportunities:
 (1)
Melting snowpack from the Wind River Mountains give rise to the Green River, Wyoming’s second longest. After flowing south over 700 miles, the Green enters into the Colorado River ... moreand is considered by many to be this river’s headwater. Supposedly named by 16th century Spanish explorers for its clear color, a mystery since most people say it looks quite the same as the murky Colorado, the river ran basically unimpeded until the early 1960’s when the Fontenelle Dam was completed. One year later another dam was built in Dutch John, Utah, which flooded the scenic, red-rock Flaming Gorge for nearly 90 miles, creating a deep-water fishery famous for its monster lake trout and trophy browns.

Despite man’s effort to tame the Green, over 150 miles of the river still run free. Set between the Bridger-Teton National Forest and Bridger Wilderness area, the remote river basin has retained its rugged, pristine, scenic beauty. Locals joke that there are more elk, bear and deer in residence than people, a fact attractive for those seeking an authentic, fly fishing experience. Fishing is thought to be best during the late summer and fall seasons when there are prolific mayfly and caddis hatches and trout is plentiful, including the native Colorado River cutthroat.

Pinedale, a small resort town on US 191, is the primary hub for the upper Green River, attracting anglers from as far as Jackson. Another small town, Green River located on I-80, services sportsmen along the lower portion of the river. Fly shops are in abundance and guides are widely available at both locations. 
Fly fishers who seek to get far from the maddening crowd should consider the Clark’s Fork, as it offers ample fish, scenic beauty and alluring solitude. The river makes its grand entrance ... moreinto Wyoming from Montana through a rift in the jagged, glaciated Absaroka Mountains. Surrounded by soaring, snow-capped peaks, the river is bounded by the Beartooth Mountains to the northeast and the rugged Sawtooth Mountains to the southeast. Running for over 60 miles through the state, its upper waters are full of Yellowstone cutthroat, rainbow and brook trout while grayling and brown trout can be found below the famous Canyon section as the river makes its way back to Montana.

Designated as Wyoming’s first Wild and Scenic River, it flows through verdant, conifer forests, a stunning, 20 mile-long Canyon area, and open farm and ranch lands. The river descends from 8,500 feet at its headwaters near Cooke City to less than 3,000 at its northeastern crossing at the state line. The spectacular canyon portion of the river is as popular with hikers, kayakers and river rafters as it is with fishermen. Adventurers around the globe come here to experience its Class IV to Class VI rapids.

Technically the river is open year-round for fishing although the Colter and Beartooth passes are usually blocked by snow until late May. Public access can be gained from the highways that parallel most of the upper river through the Shoshone National Forest and anglers can, with a few exceptions, stop and fish at their leisure. Much of the lower river runs through private land although the Wyoming Game and Fish manage 4 public access points making it possible to enjoy fishing in these waters. Spring runoff can continue through June, sometimes even into mid-July, and then tends to remain steady from late summer and well into September.
If you like to fish for steelhead, and the Clearwater is best known for them, then you already know your ABC’s. Steelheads are classified as A-run or B-run fish depending on their ... moresize, spawning habits and time spent in the ocean. More precisely, they are rainbow trout that venture to the Pacific and back to fresh water. A-runs typically appear in Idaho early in the season, from June through August, most often spend only one year in salt water, and return to the Snake and Salmon Rivers. B-runs usually return to the Clearwater River although some do migrate to the Salmon. Because B-runs spend at least 2 years in the ocean they tend to be much larger, weighing in at 10-13 pounds and 31-34 inches long, compared with the A-runs that register around 4-6 pounds and are generally only 23-26 inches long.

Not surprisingly, the fly fishing seasons on the River are divided according to the A and B runs, and while the A’s tend to be smaller they are reputed to be aggressive and capable of putting up a hard, long fight. For those in pursuit of larger quarry, you’ll have to move upstream along with the fish throughout their season. Because Clearwater B-Run steelhead are the largest in the lower 48, anglers are happy to make this trek, coming from around the globe to try their luck and test their fly fishing acumen. As the river winds its way from coniferous forests to scrappy desert, the water mysteriously manages to remain clear, rarely affected by erosion or runoff, making it stable and highly predictable and thus easier to master after repeated visits. 

The town of Orofino is a great base for fishing the Clearwater with a nice selection of hotels, motels, ranches, lodges and neighboring campgrounds for anyone who desires a genuine, outdoor experience. Just across the river is the Dworskak Reservoir where there’s great fishing for kokanee, bass and other trout. Water sports are welcome within the Reservoir where you can jet ski, rent a power-boat or take out a quiet floater, canoe or kayak. Winter sports include skiing, hunting and snowmobiling, all within a short distance of downtown.

Things to Know

The Clearwater River in north-central Idaho is renowned for outstanding fishing for B-run steelhead and chinook salmon, and to a lesser extent, native cutthroat trout in the summer. In the fall, the steelhead season kicks in with catch-and-release fishing in September, and then catch-and-keep from October to the end of April. B-run steelhead in the Clearwater average 12-14 pounds, but many of them go higher, in the 20-pound range.

During May and September, when the weather is cooler, dress warmly or in layers. It is always cooler in the morning.

During the warmer months, June through mid-September, the typical attire is shorts, t-shirts and sports sandals.

Bring along water, a hat, sunglasses and sunscreen.

Be prepared to get wet and dress according to your comfort level.

Wear clothes that dry quickly and perhaps steer away from denim pants or shorts and leather footwear.

Life jackets are provided on outfitted trips.
The Smith River is nationally one of the most well known streams in the U.S., in large part because of the unique experience it offers. For visitors from all over Montana and across ... morethe country lucky enough to draw float permits, the Smith River float, with access to a 59-mile stretch of river only at its upper and lower ends, holds a pristine adventure. The river begins its 121-mile journey near the town of White Sulphur Springs where the North and South forks of the Smith merge. For much of its course, the mainstem runs through a broad valley between the Big Belt Mountains on the west and the Little Belt and Castle Mountains on the east.

From Camp Baker, the upper public access point to the canyon, the Smith carries rafters and canoers through a deep, rock-walled passage with great fishing, floating, and boat camping. Emerging at the canyon's lower end, the stream meanders on through rolling grass-covered hills until it reaches the Missouri, near Ulm.
Game Fish Opportunities:

Fishing Reports

Get up to date information on fishing conditions . Learn about water flows, fish species, and current weather. Download maps and locate fishing access sites . Discover the best guided fly fishing trips . Plan a fishing trip today.

Fishing Trip Resources