Bamboo Fly Rod Building Workshop At Grand Lake Stream

Category:
bamboo fly rods, downeast lakes land trust, grand lake
Added Date:
Friday, 13 Dec, 2013
Summary
Regular readers know I get all tingly when I think of Grand Lake Stream (it's one of the few destinations that will make me board a commercial aircraft).
 
Content
Regular readers know I get all tingly when I think of Grand Lake Stream (it's one of the few destinations that will make me board a commercial aircraft).

Now imagine how the naughty bits feel when I contemplate being there while building my very own bamboo fly rod...

Bamboo Fly Rod Making Workshop

Monday, April 21, 2014 - 9:00 AM
Grand Lake Stream

The Downeast Lakes Land Trust is pleased to welcome back David P. Van Burgel and Kathy J. Scott from Ardea Bamboo Rods to teach this workshop. Dave is a nationally recognized rod maker who teaches others the art of split cane fly rods to preserve the traditional Maine craft. Kathy has written four books on the subject including, Changing Planes and Moose on the Water, Bamboo on the Bench.

The goal of the week-long class will be for each participant to craft a bamboo fly rod from raw cane to ferruled blank. David and Kathy will also provide instruction on the addition of guides/eyes and the varnish/finish beyond the class. The cost of the class will be $650 per student which will include all materials to make a 2 piece ferruled bamboo fly rod blank with grip and reel seat, guides and wrapping thread. To provide intensive one-on-one instruction, class size will be limited to five individuals.

Sign up now by contacting the Downeast Lakes Land Trust via email (info@downeastlakes.org) or phone (207)796-2100. Registration closes on February 1st.

It's important to note that at every other bamboo rod building class I know of, the students are routinely beaten with their failed fly rod blanks. I'm highlighting this unique event because at this class, the beatings are optional.

In other words, they'll smack you with sticks only if you like that sort of thing (not surprisingly, many fly fishermen do).


(Clearly, nobody in the industry provides news of more beating-free classes than the Underground).

Read More When I Die Bury Me with My Phillipson Bamboo Fly Rods - Part One

See you applying salve to the welts, Tom Chandler.
 
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Destinations
 (1)
Famous for its dramatic fall foliage, cheddar cheese and maple syrup, anglers should know that Vermont also has great fly fishing. As the second least populated state in the nation, ... morewhat Vermont lacks in people it makes up for in fish. Lurking under many of those quaint, covered bridges are big, beautiful trout – lots of them.

When fishing in Vermont, consider staying in Manchester, an old-style, New England town of 4,400, with all the amenities of a modern, weekend getaway. Alongside the town runs the Battenkill River, still home to the famous tackle manufacturer, CF Orvis Company, first founded in 1856.

A short distance away, are two additional jewels, the Mettawee River, 5 miles away, and the Walloomsac, approximately 15 miles from Manchester. Pick up any guide book and you’ll find everyone agrees these pristine rivers flow through gorgeous scenery – flowered meadows, virgin hemlocks and tall stands of native hardwood trees – the prettiest angling in the East.

For friends and family not inclined to fish, the area has much to offer.

Fine artisanal shops and restaurants as well as commercial outlet-stores

Emerald Lake State Park - year round wild life and outdoor recreation

Golf Club at Equinox, a highly rated course and spa

American Museum of Fly Fishing, rich in history and fishing lore

The Vermont season opens the 2nd Saturday in April and ends late October. Late spring and late fall tend to the most favored times to fish. 

The options for traveling to Manchester include:

Fly into the Albany International Airport and drive for about 1 ½ hour.

Fly into the Burlington International Airport and drive for about 2 hours.
Fishing Waters
The North Fork and South Fork of the Kern Wild and Scenic River is located within a four-hour drive of more than one-third of the population of southern California. With its range ... moreof elevation, topography and vegetation, it offers a broad spectrum of recreation opportunities for all seasons of the year. Principal outdoor recreation activities include fishing, hiking, camping and whitewater boating.

The North Fork flows through Sequoia National Park and the Sequoia National Forest, past post-pile formations, spiked-granite protrusions and sharp rock ledges. The North Fork Kern River canyon within the Golden Trout Wilderness may be the longest, linear glacially-sculpted valley in the world. It contains regionally unique features referred to as Kernbuts and Kerncols. These rounded to elongated (parallel to the axis of the canyon) granitic knobs (Kernbuts) and the depressions between them (Kerncols) were first identified and named in the Kern Canyon.

The North Fork River corridor also includes regionally uncommon wetland habitat at Kern Lakes and the alkaline seep at the Forks of the Kern. The wetland habitat contains several uncommon aquatic and marsh species; the alkaline seep also supports several uncommon plants. The river's deep pool habitat supports a population of wild trout and also vividly colored hybrid trout.

The South Fork Kern River flows through a diverse landscape, including whitewater, waterfalls, large granite outcrops interspersed with open areas and open meadows with extensive vistas. The segment in the Dome Land Wilderness flows by numerous granitic domes and through a rugged and steep granitic gorge where whitewater rapids are common.

With a gradient of 30 feet per mile, the North Fork Kern is one of the steepest and wildest whitewater rivers in North America. The Forks Run is a nearly continuous series of Class IV and V rapids and waterfalls. The Upper Kern is a popular stretch of river for whitewater boating, camping and fishing. The Lower Kern runs 32 miles from Isabella Dam to the canyon mouth above Bakersfield, California.
Trips
$
275
-
$
615
/ Boat
Capacity:
1 - 4 anglers
Days:
Daily
Duration:
4 hours - 1 day
Fishing Waters:
The Merced River originates in the Southeastern corner of Yosemite National Park. Its headwaters begin at 7900 feet at the Clarke Range. It flows over Nevada and Vernal Falls, and ... morelastly, Illilouette Creek before she flows through the main Yosemite Valley. Then the Merced, picks up water from Tenaya, Yosemite, Bridalveil, and Pigeon Creeks near the end of the valley, and meeting up the water from Cascade Creek before the river flows through the Merced River Canyon and then outside the park. Its South and North Forks join it a few miles outside the park.

The Lower Merced is another river that can be drifted, water flow permitting, or walk & waded January through May.
$
300
-
$
400
/ Angler
Capacity:
1 - 2 anglers
Days:
Daily
Duration:
4 hours - 1 day
Enjoy a day fishing the Truckee River near Sierraville, California. With our extensive experience fishing the Truckee River, we have the vast knowledge needed to help you catch fish ... moreand have fun doing it. We specialize in guided trips for fishermen of all types from first-time anglers, to experts.
$
375
-
$
500
/ Boat
Capacity:
1 - 2 anglers
Days:
Daily
Duration:
4 hours - 8 hours
If you have ever driven over the Lower Sacramento River or even fished it, you know that due to its shear size and abundance of water, this makes it extremely intimidating. That's ... morewhy having a knowledgable Lower Sacramento River Fly Fishing Guide is so important. A great guide will not only put you on the fish, but will also show you the fishy spots accessable by land, the put ins and pull outs for boats, as well as the bug life, the flies to use and when you go on your own, how to put all that t ogether to be successful. The Lower Sacramento River is a big tailwater fishery and California's biggest trout river, and its rainbows are just as big and powerful as the river they live in. If you want big fish and year-round fishing, this is the river for you. With more food than your local all you can eat buffets (2,500 insects per square foot of river), the average fish grows to a healthy and hard-fighting 16-18", and pigs pushing two feet are not out of the question, so bring some big guns. The fishing season is year-round, and water temperatures remain fairly constant too, as the river comes out of the bottom of Shasta Lake.

This river consists of long, indescribable, spring creek like stretches that are broken up by islands, deep pools, long riffles, gravel bars and undulating shelf’s, many of which are more pronounced during lower flows.

If having one of the best trout fisheries in the state isn’t enough, the Lower Sac also hosts some great runs of Steelhead and Chinook salmon too. It also hosts a variety of other fish, such as, shad, squawfish, stripers, largemouth and smallmouth bass, these populations of fish become higher the farther you get away from Shasta Lake. The highest flows are during the summer months, when snow melt is at its greatest, so a drift boat is highly recommended.

You can walk and wade during the higher flows if you so desire, but staying near the bank will be your safest bet. The best time to walk and wade the Lower Sac is going to be during fall, winter and early spring, there is very little snow melt, and the rain that falls goes to filling up the lake, so the river is low and great for walk and wading. This is the time to get out there and really learn the river's bottom and fish those slots that only come out in lower flows, either way “PLEASE WADE WITH CAUTION”. But due to the river’s size and the amount of private property along its banks, those that prefer to wade have two options. One is to fish from public parks and access points along the 16 miles or river between Redding and Anderson, or, from your boat, getting out at the riffles and fishy slots to make some casts.

Public access is fairly easy though on the Lower Sac, there are 6 boat launches, and many public parks and access points along the river that flows almost parallel with interstate 5.

-Brian
Outfitters
 (12)
We are a team of friendly and knowledgeable fly fishing guides, with a combined 40 years of fly fishing experience, dedicated to making your adventure on the water with us as enjoyable ... moreand informative as possible. We want you to succeed in all of your fishy endeavors, and we will take the time with you to make sure that you have all the techniques and skills necessary to catch fish wherever you go. Float or Walk and wade with us on one of Northern California's finest rivers and streams and we will accommodate our guiding style to meet your needs and abilities. With our extensive fly fishing knowledge and experience on waters all over Northern California, we will guide you on a fly fishing trip you will not soon forget.

NCFG practices catch and release on all boats. We respect the sport of fishing and wish to give all anglers the opportunity to experience the gratification we strive to give each of our clients.
Type:
Fishing
14 comments
I agree. Most of my bamboo is older than that, and there's no reason -- outside of a rod that's already compromised -- for one to break when landing fish.
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Why would you be afraid to fish with that rod? I have a Granger made in 1935 that is still tearin' up the trout to this day. With a little common sense, bamboo is generally tougher than graphite, and a fly rod deserves to be fished. Take it out and get it bent brother!
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Heh, the first fly rod I ever had was a bamboo one. I still have it, but I'm afraid that if I take it out, it will snap like a twig on the first bite. The thing is about 23 years old, but I still don't have the heart to throw it away. Too many memories related to it.
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Kathy Scott: Salve to the welts?tsk tsk tsk Surely you’ve been in Maine enough to know we use pine pitch. Love to have you come out – everyone! David, we’d be back at Grayrock, no doubt about it, if we weren’t teaching a cane rodmaking class in the Catskills that week.Great time. Thanks JJP:-) Kat Note the crafty lack of any mention of a "beatings optional" policy. Woman knows how to avoid the ... more tough questions...
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Salve to the welts? tsk tsk tsk Surely you've been in Maine enough to know we use pine pitch. Love to have you come out - everyone! David, we'd be back at Grayrock, no doubt about it, if we weren't teaching a cane rodmaking class in the Catskills that week. Great time. Thanks JJP :-) Kat
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The beatings SHOULD be optional. And, I suppose that some people like that. @ Marty - I betcha that you might make the first one for 5 large or less. I did and even got the second hand lathe I coveted! It's a wonderful thing, because I still haven't stopped throwing money at it. And, there are a few folks enjoying my work; even the 'glas and CF. I'm thinking that no matter what the hobby or avocation, ... more it should be fun!
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Hi Tom Merry Christmas! Another great bamboo rod building event is Rodmakers at Grayrock. It's in what we call the "norther lower" here in Michigan. The event is within a stones throw of the birth place of Trout Unlimited. A great event - http://www.rodmakersatgrayrock.org/index.html On a side note did my fly box make it into your hands? Again Thanks!
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JJP: Kidding aside, David and Kathy are among the best teachers I have ever met. They taught us about bamboo so well, the after a week at the Catskill Fly Fishing Center and Museum, I was fully “committed” to developing my skills in rod making. I feel compelled to point out that they may be great teachers, the "no beating" concept was mine. I don't recall either of them mentioning a "no beating" policy ... more until after I did.
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Marty: I’m going to go out on a limb and say that learning to make my own bamboo rods to save money is about as effective as learning to tie flies for the same reason….. My first Salmon fly cost $1376.42……. I bet my first bamboo rod after such a class would cost about 25-30K…… Accurate. I always say my second Adams Parachute cost me pennies to produce (and looked like it), but the first cost $1200...
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"Do you know Kathy Scott?!?" Emphasis should be added with an Italian accent. Kidding aside, David and Kathy are among the best teachers I have ever met. They taught us about bamboo so well, the after a week at the Catskill Fly Fishing Center and Museum, I was fully "committed" to developing my skills in rod making. Going to this , or any other rod making class taught by them and/or Gathering would ... more certainly be a fine way to be introduced to the fine madness of the Maker. See ya at the poor farm.
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I'm going to go out on a limb and say that learning to make my own bamboo rods to save money is about as effective as learning to tie flies for the same reason..... My first Salmon fly cost $1376.42....... I bet my first bamboo rod after such a class would cost about 25-30K......
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Thanks for the reminder about Maine fishing and the fun of making my own bamboo rod. Great fun!
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Victor: Hope it doesn’t Raine on your parade I think Raine's done offering rod building classes, which -- given his tendency to cane students Hong Kong style -- is probably for the best. Support Cruelty-Free Bamboo!
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Hope it doesn't Raine on your parade
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